This Is Not Utopia

Honey’s work schedule has been weird lately due to his hours being cut until they can find more work for him. Tonight he was asked to work a shift at very short notice, so he’ll be staying up all night without the “luxury” of having his body adjusted to a night schedule. This always concerns me, because it does take a toll on your body to be repeatedly denied sleep. Anyway. This all got me thinking about the way we live our lives in civilized, modern countries. Most people spend long hours doing something for other people so we can be paid enough to feed ourselves and have a place to sleep at night. If other people don’t need things done, we’re stuck as unemployed. We take jobs in desperation that we wouldn’t otherwise choose. What if more people set up as farmers (smallish, sustainable farms) with the intention of growing enough to feed their families and then selling the rest? What if more of us got closer to the land instead of holing up in concrete jungles and sitting in offices every day? I wonder how far the unemployment rate would drop if people moved to self-sustaining jobs? I truly envy those people who have found ways to become totally or mostly self-sufficient through farming, animal husbandry, solar power, and other means. I would much rather see myself, Honey, Buddy, and any future offspring spending our hours creating our own livelihood rather than going off to be cogs in the industrial machine.

When I think of Utopia, I see people choosing to live together as communities. They care about their fellow humans, the critters, and the earth that sustains all of us. They have chosen a life centered on experiences rather than stuff. As an American, I don’t see many people who are willing to choose experiences over stuff. I see a culture fixated on the latest smart phone, the most convenient and tasty way to fill their bellies, and the best paying job so they can buy more stuff (and a big enough house to put said stuff). I also see a lot of people so stuck in the system that they will never realize there is a way out or find an opportunity to get out (that feels like us, sometimes, but we’re on our way). This is not Utopia and it never will be. It is my personal belief that, the farther we get from living off the land, the farther from happiness and viability we will become. You can live in a city and still find ways to “live off the land,” by the way (co-ops, CSA’s, farmer’s markets, etc.). I could ramble on a bit longer about the health benefits of getting your hands and feet into the dirt and interacting with Nature in general, but I think I should go to bed now. Hopefully my scattered thoughts make some sense to you. I have well over 50 followers now – would love if a few (or all) of you gave me some input from time to time.

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PeopleTowels – Awesomeness You Should Try!

I used to buy a lot of Stoneyfield Farm’s yogurt, and on every carton they used to print a code that could be used to redeem prizes. One of the prizes I used my points for was this nifty little towel made by PeopleTowels. I kept it in my purse and found it to be extremely convenient for drying my hands when I was out and about (and to clean up messes or whatever else life brought my way). So, when I had enough points, I ordered another one. I now have three and absolutely love them!

By choosing a reusable towel over disposable towels, you could save More

Aside

Radical Notions

Up until the last hundred years (approximately), all/most:

Milk went straight from the cow to being used for butter, cheese, yogurt, etc (raw milk)

Produce was never treated with pesticides & other chemicals (organic)

Produce & Animals were of the heirloom or hybrid varieties (non-GMO)

Animals were kept on pasture as long as it was seasonally available (grass fed meat)

Eggs & Chicken came from hens who moved about freely, ate bugs, & scratched in the dirt (free range)

Food came from a nearby farmer, butcher, or your own backyard (local, self-sufficient)

Food was grown by farmers who rotated crops & the pastures used for grazing, grew a variety of items, etc. (sustainable)

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These things aren’t new; they’re much older than the recent changes brought on by the Industrial Age. We really screwed up when we prioritized convenience and easy over quality and sustainability.

Remind me again why I’m crazy and radical for wanting the same things?

local is growing

I Want to Save the World… But How?

There are a lot of things in this world that are really, really wrong. People who are killed, families torn apart, children who are starving. So many of us seem set on promoting violence and war instead of peace. How many millions have died because we couldn’t get along and show love to our neighbors?

Then there are all of the problems that have come with industrialization and modern things. The great power of science is being used for profit instead of the good of the people and the very future of humanity could be at stake (antibiotic resistant illnesses, GMO’s, global warming caused by plastics and so many other things, polluted air and water, chemicals in our food and everything around us).

It’s a lot to take in, and once you have taken it all in, you’re left wondering, “Well… what now? What can I do?” More

Clean Water, At Last!

Back in late 2010 (or early 2011, not sure), I began seeing a massage therapist who promoted natural, green living. She kept chickens in her backyard (in the city), grew her own herbs, had a compost pile, collected rainwater, walked instead of driving when possible, and didn’t wear a bra. She was extremely friendly and genuine. Looking back, I’m almost certain she was Wiccan or at the least Pagan, which is cool. Anyway. She lent me a book that helped open my eyes so that I could see the corruption and abuse around me. It discussed things like how fluoride came to be put into the public’s drinking water (it didn’t have anything to do with dental health), the effects of pesticides and insecticides on human health and our environment, and so many other things. It was all very new and overwhelming to me at the time; parts of me were skeptical, but the more I observed and experienced in life the more I knew the information was true (the book’s sources and more research on my part were a big factor, of course). The truth about what is in public water has weighed heavy on my mind ever since. The things we ingest on a daily basis, when consuming public water, are far from safe. Rather, the chemicals and such in our water are poisonous to our bodies. Small children, infants, and fetuses are especially susceptible to these toxins. Fluoride may or may not be beneficial for teeth when used topically, but it is NOT beneficial to ingest it. Even the ADA is beginning to recognize this fact. Wikipedia’s page on dietary minerals says,  More

Who do you trust? Nature or Chemicals?

I had a thought this morning. The push for low-fat diets and foods is both harmful and unnatural. Why, then, would people be pushing for low-fat (the science isn’t actually there)? That’s when it hit me. It isn’t in the best interest of the food industry (or pharmaceutical for that matter) to promote foods in their natural state. If it was promoted that foods were best in their natural state, we’d be able to get most things from farmers or even grow/raise our own. But if low-fat is the “healthy” way to eat, we are stuck going to the store to buy products that have been tampered with, things that we can only get from the food industry. Also, it’s probably more expensive for companies to use foods in their whole, natural state than it is for them to be able to fill in the gaps with chemicals and other cheap fillers, allowing the real stuff to be spread further. That last bit is purely speculation on my part, but it makes sense. More

This is really sad. Why must humanity rape the earth?