Thoughts on Proselytizing

A Facebook friend (who is IFB) posted something about seeing the Osteens on the news this morning. She said they were discussing the need to forgive the Boston bombers to prevent bitterness. But, she was very disappointed that they didn’t make a point of saying Jesus was the answer. No mention of salvation. What a tragedy for non-Christians everywhere who were looking to the Osteens for answers.

It is taking a lot of self control to keep me from making a comment. The statements she made make me laugh and then feel angry. I think some of my anger stems from the fact that I once would have agreed with her and “liked” her status. The other bit of anger comes from using a news story about a time of crisis to proselytize those watching. If we want religion, if we’re looking for your god, we will come to church and ask you for more information. Shouting the name of Jesus from the rooftops doesn’t make me want to go ask you questions. It makes me laugh at you/be scared of you and think you’re a deranged lunatic. Quiet testimonies are More

Advertisements

For Shame

This letter is flying about on facebook amongst my IFB friends. I read it and was appalled. The woman who wrote it has chosen to believe that a fundamental aspect of her biological make-up – her sexuality – is a grievous sin.

IFB’s and those who are similar to them are notorious for making sex and sexuality out to be a great evil (unless you’re a man). I myself was effected by that teaching. But the woman who wrote this letter has to deal with more than “just” sex. She is a lesbian. A homosexual. As most IFB’s I know would say, she is a “pervert.” Such ideology makes me sick. This woman is expected to ignore her sexuality and never find pleasure in sex (because to have sex with another woman would be an abomination!). She will probably be expected to find a way to “fix” herself and rewire her brain to find men arousing, not women. She will be expected to either never find a companion to spend her life with, or to choose a man and marry him. For a lesbian (not a bisexual), being with a man, even if she loves him, can be unsatisfying, scary, and possibly feel more like rape than making love. And for that husband, how will he feel? What awkward, possibly awful place will he be put into? Both partners in a relationship deserve to find happiness and satisfaction in their sex life – it is a basic human need and one of the reasons we form such relationships. More

Merry Christmas!

The holiday season is in full swing now. I love Christmas time – singing the songs, decorating everything, making special foods, time spent with family and friends. This will be my 2nd Christmas as a non-Christian. I still find Christmas to be a wondrous time, and yes, I still call it Christmas. The Nativity Story is still very beautiful to me. It’s also not unique to Christianity (son of a god is born, will save the world by sacrificing himself); it’s a very common theme running through a lot of other mythologies. It’s a story that’s been told for thousands of years, all over the world, and it’s still captivating people today. The Christian additions of singing angels, a stable filled with animals and hay, and wise men journeying from afar all make the story even more special to people, I think. It’s a cozy, heart warming story that makes people smile and open their hearts with love and joy.

I view Christianity’s stories as mythology, the same as the rest of the world’s mythologies. They are all works of humanity that we can learn from. So I will teach my children about Jesus and why Christmas has the name it does, right along with the other great stories of the world.

May you have a merry Christmas and happy holidays, friend!

This is an excellent article found at this site:

When God was Pro-Choice and Why He Changed His Mind

In the autumn of 1978 the Washington Association of Churches and the Washington State Catholic Conference jointly published a six page pamphlet they called, “Abortion: An Ecumenical Study Document.” Their work offers a fascinating snapshot of Christian thinking at the time and raises some equally fascinating questions about what, exactly, has happened in the last thirty-five years.

The pamphlet does not contain a position statement. Quite the opposite, in fact. From the beginning, the authors explain that such an agreement is impossible:

Clearly there is no Christian position on abortion, for here real values conflict with each other, and Christian persons who seek honestly to be open to God’s call still find themselves disagreeing profoundly.

At the time, five years had passed since the Rove v. Wade decision, and the Church, broadly, was wrestling with ethical and spiritual complexities the decision brought to the surface. The WAC, which existed “to express and strengthen the unity Christians have in Jesus Christ” had asked member denominations to create a study group because strong feelings on the question of abortion were threating that mission. In the absence of an agreement, the study group articulated a set of shared values and then assembled statements on abortion from member denominations.

Some of the contents would come as little surprise to anyone aware of today’s struggles over abortion ethics and rights. More

Aside